Canadian Classic Cars For Sale

CANADIAN CLASSIC CARS FOR SALE. CAR REPOSSESSION FOR SALE. USED CAR DEALERSHIP OHIO

Canadian Classic Cars For Sale

canadian classic cars for sale
    classic cars
  • (Classic car) To qualify as such for tax purposes, the car must be at least 15 years old at the end of the tax year, and have a market value of over £15,000
  • Classic car is a term used to describe an older car, but the exact meaning is subject to differences in opinion. The Classic Car Club of America, maintains that a car must be between 20 and 45 years old to be a classic, while cars over 45 years fall into the Antique Class.
    for sale
  • For Sale is a tour EP by Say Anything. It contains 3 songs from …Is a Real Boy and 2 additional b-sides that were left off the album.
  • purchasable: available for purchase; "purchasable goods"; "many houses in the area are for sale"
  • For Sale is the fifth album by German pop band Fool's Garden, released in 2000.
    canadian
  • of or relating to Canada or its people
  • a native or inhabitant of Canada
  • a river rising in northeastern New Mexico and flowing eastward across the Texas panhandle to become a tributary of the Arkansas River in Oklahoma
canadian classic cars for sale – So, You
So, You Want to Be Canadian: All About the Most Fascinating People in the World and the Magical Place They Call Home
So, You Want to Be Canadian: All About the Most Fascinating People in the World and the Magical Place They Call Home
So, you want to be Canadian? Who doesn’t these days? Canucks are enjoying a major renaissance in attention, from their enlightened social policies to their wild and wooly pop culture. This playful, trivia-packed book is a long-overdue celebration of all things Canadian, from the mysteries of “eh?” to the difference between an Ogo Pogo and a Windingo to how to prepare moose stroganoff (mmm!). Featuring a dreamy list of Canadian hotties, a toe-tapping roundup of Canadian smash hit songs, a handy CanadianAmerican translator, and pointers on how to eat, dress, and apologize like a Canadian if you weren’t lucky enough to be born a Canuck, So, You Want to Be Canadian demonstrates once and for all why Canada is so cool (formerly just cold).

McLaughlin Canada Buick 8 1937 detailed grille and badge
McLaughlin Canada Buick 8 1937 detailed grille and badge
Despite being all new last year, the cars were revamped in a big way for the 1937 model year. The grille was split, allowing the Buick coat of arms to be mounted front and centre on a slender river of chrome flanked with fine horizontal chrome ribs. New, more graceful, teardrop headlights were mounted on either side of the grille for a stately look. Wipers were no longer mounted from above the windshield, but from the cowl. The radio aerial disappeared, discretely embedded in the running board. Body height was lowered by 1.5 inches and a corresponding 2.5-inch drop in the floor meant the cavernous interior was maintained.

The public met the 1937 McLaughlin-Buicks in November of 1936. In a bid to impress potential buyers, sales personnel were trained to discuss the current crop of automobiles from the ground up. Starting with the famous sealed chassis, they moved on to point out the quieter valve-in-head straight-eight engine, the five-point soft rubber engine mountings, the centre-point controlled steering, the tip-toe hydraulic brakes, knee action wheels, torque-tube drive and ride stabilizers located fore and aft. The car was mighty and magnificent. It came with an impeccable pedigree that reached back to horse and buggy days. It was easy to sing the praises of such a fine motorcar.

Salesmen were instructed to draw attention to the all steel-welded-to-steel body construction that boasted the safety of a solid steel Turret Top on the Special models. “McLaughlin-Buick bodies have in 1937 the same master craftsmanship in their coachwork which they have had for years.” For good measure, folks looking at the gleaming beauties in showrooms were reminded that safety glass was used all around.

As important as any feature built into the vehicle was the possibility of buying a new McLaughlin-Buick through the General Motors Installment Plan. With “payments to suit your purse,” the scheme claimed to have already advanced more than 11 million purchases in North America. In addition, GM had its own insurance company. General Exchange Insurance Corporation, a.k.a. GEIC, offered insurance protection and the capacity to “render claims and make adjustments throughout Canada.”

[The 1937 McLaughlin-Buick Roadmaster four-door Sedan with trunk carried a $1,690 price tag.]
The McLaughlin-Buick was an upscale offering in the world of automobiles, carefully positioned between the mid-range, mid-priced Oldsmobile and just below the luxurious LaSalle by Cadillac. With inspired whispers of elegance, distinction and class, McLaughlin-Buick came in four distinct series for 1937: Special, Century, Roadmaster and the Limited.

The 122-inch wheelbased Special was the entry level car, ideal for the family ready to move into the pampered world of McLaughlin-Buick. A Sport Coupe with “ingeniously positioned” folding opera seats was the lowest priced in the stable with a starting price of $1,055. A five-passenger Coach with trunk, a five-passenger Sedan with trunk and a four-passenger convertible with rumble seat were all equally modestly priced. The Special got around town and country with a 248-cubic inch straight eight that generated 100 horsepower.
[The 1937 McLaughlin-Buick Special four-door Sedan with trunk weighed in at 3,610 pounds and cost $1,110. No GM cars were built in the Regina, Saskatchewan plant that year.]
Century was bigger and better appointed than the Special. Its engine generated 130 horsepower and its displacement was 320 cubic inches. Four inches longer in the wheelbase than last year, Century now rode a 126-inch wheelbase and could be had as a five-passenger Coach or a five-passenger Sedan, both came with trunk. The four-passenger Convertible Coupe boasted a rumble seat. A great deal of attention was drawn to the generously proportioned trunks. “Why embarrass yourself with a trailer for your valises when the jumbo baggage compartment can serve you?”

The spare tire rode in a special space below the trunk floor, making tire changing less of a hassle. Having stated that, these dignified land yachts also could be ordered with optional cost, side-mounted tires, neatly tucked into gracefully elongated front fenders. The classic feature was standard equipment on the Roadmaster four-door convertible and the two Limited models.

Further up the scale was the impressive Roadmaster. This grand automobile stretched lazily over a 131-inch wheelbase and seated six in full comfort. It shared an engine with the Century. The Formal Sedan could be ordered with optional movable glass partition to set passengers apart from the chauffeur. A four-door convertible carried a price tag of $2,050.

[The 1937 McLaughlin-Buick Limited Imperial Sedan seated eight and came with glass to separate the chauffeur from passengers. The most expensive of the McLaughlin-Buick clan, the limousine sold for $2,600.] Gliding majestically on a 138-inch wheelbase, the Limited was the penultimate McLaughlin-Buick. Seating eight passengers, it was off

1955 Dodge Mayfair
1955 Dodge Mayfair
The Dodge Mayfair was an automobile built by Chrysler Corporation of Canada Ltd. This vehicle was produced solely for the Canadian market from 1953 to 1959. Its American equivalent was the Plymouth Belvedere. It was based on the Plymouth, a vehicle that Chrysler of Canada had been offering since 1935 and Chrysler in Detroit started offering in export markets in 1936.

The Mayfair name first appeared as a 2-door hardtop in the 1951 Dodge Regent series, just as the Belvedere appeared in the Cranbrook series. The 1952 Mayfair adopted the same paint scheme as the 1952 Belvedere with the roof color sweeping down onto the rear trunk.

When the 1953 models were introduced, the Mayfair was again the hardtop in the Dodge Regent series. In April, 1953, though, Chrysler of Canada introduced a new, upscale series to do battle with the Chevrolet Bel Air and Pontiac Laurentian.
Thus the D43-3 Dodge Mayfair was introduced in both hardtop and sedan models. (Contrary to published articles, the D43-3 series was not a wagon). The exterior had the front fender trim extend onto the front door and backup lamps were standard. Interiors were two-tone, in either blue or green, with a matching steering wheel. With the new D43-3 Mayfair, Regent Mayfair hardtop was dropped.

Under the hood, the engine was increased from 218.0 CID to 228.1 CID. And Chrysler of Canada introduced Hy-Drive on Plymouth and Dodge models. The system was a torque converter that shared it oil with the engine, along with a clutch and a 3-speed manual transmission.

For 1954 the Mayfair used the interiors of the new full-line Plymouth Belvedere. The engine continued to be a 228.1 CID unit, and Hy-Drive continued as an option. For the first time since 1937, Chrysler of Canada offered a convertible in its Plymouth-based models, importing the Mayfair convertible from Detroit, being a Dodge Kingsway Custom convertible with Mayfair nameplates.

The V8 engine came to Chrysler of Canada’s low-priced models in 1955. The engines were imported from Detroit with various covers, manifolds, electrical pieces and rubber parts added in Windsor. Only the Mayfair offered the V8. And both Plymouth and Dodge offered PowerFlite, 2-speed automatic with its new dash-mounted control lever. The Hy-Drive unit was eliminated.

Power Flite, Dodge Mayfair.
Things changed in 1956 when Chrysler of Canada opened a new V8 engine plant. The Mayfair was now V8 only, while the lower-priced Dodge Crusader and Dodge Regent could be had with either the six or V8. Early in the model the 270 cubic inch engine was unstalled while later in the year the all new 277 cubic inch version was introduced. A 4-door hardtop was added to the Mayfair line and the Powerflite automatic was controlled by new dash-mounted pushbuttons.

Totally new bodies designed by Virgil Exner debuted for 1957. They were a styling sensation with their low lines, plenty of glass and thin roof designs. Body engineering and tooling errors, though, resulted in a car that quickly gained a reputation for poor quality and rust. Chrysler Corporation’s new 3-speed Torqueflite automatic was now available on all Mayfair models, still only with the 303 CID V8 engine, and all Chrysler Corporation cars adopted Torsion-Aire torsion bar front suspension.
Sales for 1957 were down from 1956 for all Canadian built Dodge models, but 1958 was a disaster with sales falling over 40%. Grilles, taillights and trim were all that were new for 1958. The Dodge Mayfair adopted the 313 CID poly V8 engine.

The Mayfair’s last year was 1959, when it downgraded a notch to take the place of the Regent, while the Crusader was dropped from the line up. The 1959 Mayfair still came in two and four door versions of the sedan and hardtop, plus the imported 3-seat Custom Suburban station wagon and convertible. Although the wagon models were 318 CID V8 only, the other models were now available with either the 251 CID flathead six or the 313 CID V8.

For 1960 the Canadian Dodge based on the Plymouth would be replaced by another Plymouth-based car, the Dodge Dart. For 1960 the Mayfair would become a sub-model of the Dart line, and renamed the Phoenix.

The vehicle has been commonly referred to as a Plodge because of the extensive use of Plymouth components with Dodge front grilles and sold at Dodge sales outlets.

Shot on Kodak Ektar 100

canadian classic cars for sale
canadian classic cars for sale
The Unfinished Canadian: The People We Are
The award-winning, bestselling author of While Canada Slept gives his view of a country wasted on Canadians.

What is national character? What makes the Americans, the British, the French, the Russians, and the Chinese who they are? In this homogenized world, where globalization is a byword for a deadening sameness, why do peoples who live in the same region, use the same money, read the same books, and watch the same movies remain different from one another? As much as Canada may be seen as a copy, clone, or colony of America, we are unquestionably distinctive. It is a result of our geography, history, and politics. It comes from our demography and prosperity. Most of all, it comes from our character.

In The Unfinished Canadian, Andrew Cohen delves into our past and present in search of our defining national characteristics. He questions hoary shibboleths, soothing mythologies, and old saws with irreverence, humour, and flintiness, unencumbered by our proverbial politeness (itself a great misperception) and our suffocating political correctness. We are so much, in so many shades, and it’s time we took an honest look at ourselves. In this provocative, passionate, and elegant book, Cohen argues that our mythology, our jealousy, our complacency, our apathy, our amnesia, and our moderation are all part of the unbearable lightness of being Canadian.

From the Hardcover edition.

The award-winning, bestselling author of While Canada Slept gives his view of a country wasted on Canadians.

What is national character? What makes the Americans, the British, the French, the Russians, and the Chinese who they are? In this homogenized world, where globalization is a byword for a deadening sameness, why do peoples who live in the same region, use the same money, read the same books, and watch the same movies remain different from one another? As much as Canada may be seen as a copy, clone, or colony of America, we are unquestionably distinctive. It is a result of our geography, history, and politics. It comes from our demography and prosperity. Most of all, it comes from our character.

In The Unfinished Canadian, Andrew Cohen delves into our past and present in search of our defining national characteristics. He questions hoary shibboleths, soothing mythologies, and old saws with irreverence, humour, and flintiness, unencumbered by our proverbial politeness (itself a great misperception) and our suffocating political correctness. We are so much, in so many shades, and it’s time we took an honest look at ourselves. In this provocative, passionate, and elegant book, Cohen argues that our mythology, our jealousy, our complacency, our apathy, our amnesia, and our moderation are all part of the unbearable lightness of being Canadian.

From the Hardcover edition.

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